Conditions Treated

Learn about what we treat and how we help.

The potential for medical applications of low intensity laser exists in a great number of medical fields. This list contains the the musculoskeletal conditions most effectively treated.

Book an Appointment

Injuries

  • Frozen Shoulder
  • Ligament and tendon tears
  • Contusions
  • Ligament and tendon strains
  • Fractures with associated
  • Soft tissue injuries
  • Facet Joint Syndrome
  • Meniscus Tears

Inflammation

Degenerative

  • Osteoarthritis (OA)
  • Discongenic and Vertebrogenic
  • Radiculopathy
  • Chondromalacia Patella
  • Calcifications (bone spurs)
  • Degenerative Disc Disease
  • Osgood Schlatter's Disease
  • Dupuytren's Contracture

Other Applications

  • Wound Healing
  • Dermal Ulcers
  • Scar Ablation
  • Headaches
  • Sensory
  • Neuropathy
  • Post-extraction of tooth
  • Weight Loss
  • Smoking Cessation
  • Stress
  • Drug and Alcohol Addiction

Dermal Ulcers

  • Venous stasis
  • Atherosclerotic
  • Compression
  • Diabetic

carpal.jpg

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a problem that affects the wrist and hand. If you have CTS, tingling and numbness can make even simple tasks hard to do. But CTS can be treated, and your symptoms can be controlled Tingling and numbness are the most common symptoms of CTS. Some people also have hand pain or even a weakened grip. At first, symptoms may wake you up at night. Later, they may also occur during your daily routines. For instance, you may notice symptoms while you are driving or holding a newspaper. Your symptoms may become more severe over time.

RSD.jpg

Reflex Sympathetic Syndrome

Reflex sympathetic dystrophy, also known as RSD, is a condition of burning pain, stiffness, swelling, and discoloration of the hand. RSD includes other medical diagnoses such as casualgia, Sudeck's atrophy, and shoulder-hand syndrome. RSD occurs from a disturbance in the sympathetic (unconscious) nervous system that controls the blood flow and sweat glands in the hand and arm. When the nervous system becomes overactive, burning pain is felt and swelling and warmth are left in the affected arm. If not treated, RSD can cause stiffness and loss of use of the affected part of the arm.

rotator cuff.jpg

Rotator Cuff Tear

The rotator cuff is the name for the tendons that surround the shoulder joint. The rotator cuff is important in allowing the shoulder to function through a wide range of motions. In part due to the rotator cuff, the shoulder joint can move and turn through a wider range than any other joint in the body. This motion of the shoulder joint allows us to perform an amazing variety of tasks with our arms.

Unfortunately, a rotator cuff tear is not an uncommon problem, and these injuries make many routine activities difficult and painful. The rotator cuff is part of this mechanism that, when healthy functions very well, but when injured can be a difficult and frustrating problem.

tmj3.jpg

Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) Syndrome

TMJ joint disorders are medical problems related to the jaw joint. The TMJ connects the lower jaw to the skull (temporal bone) under your ear. Certain facial muscles control chewing. Problems in this area can cause head and neck pain, a jaw that is locked in position or difficult to open, problems biting, and popping sounds when you bite.

Lymphoedema is a swelling that develops as a result of an impaired lymphatic system. This may be as a result of the lymphatic system not developing properly, or through damage or trauma (see section on types of lymphoedema). It can affect any part of the body but is most commonly seen in an arm or a leg. Although thought to be relatively uncommon, a recent study has estimated that at least 100,000 people may be affected by this condition. In order to understand how lymphoedema occurs, it is important to have an understanding of the lymphatic system in general - what it is and how it works.

lymphodema.jpg

Lymphoedema

Lymphoedema is a swelling that develops as a result of an impaired lymphatic system. This may be as a result of the lymphatic system not developing properly, or through damage or trauma (see section on types of lymphoedema). It can affect any part of the body but is most commonly seen in an arm or a leg. Although thought to be relatively uncommon, a recent study has estimated that at least 100,000 people may be affected by this condition. In order to understand how lymphoedema occurs, it is important to have an understanding of the lymphatic system in general - what it is and how it works.

Frozen-Shoulder.jpg

Frozen Shoulder

Adhesive Capsulitis is the medical term for “Frozen Shoulder Syndrome” – sometimes abbreviated to FSS. This is a condition which affects the ability to move the shoulder, and usually only occurs on one side. Sometimes (approximately 1 in 5) the problem can spread to the other shoulder. The medical term literally describes what is seen in this condition – adhesive meaning sticky, and capsulitis meaning inflammation of the joint capsule. It is thought that a lot of the symptoms are due to the capsule becoming inflamed and “sticking”, making the joint stiff and difficult to move. This is not the same as arthritis, and no other joints are usually affected.

tendinitis.jpg

Bicep Tendinitis

The biceps muscle, in the front of the upper arm, helps stabilize the upper arm bone (humerus) in the shoulder socket. It also helps accelerate and decelerate the arm during overhead movement in activities like tennis or pitching. Strong, cord-like structures called tendons connect one end of the biceps muscle to the shoulder in two places. At the other end of the muscle, tendons connect the biceps muscle to the smaller bone (radius) in the lower arm. If the tendons become inflamed or irritated, the condition is called tendinitis.

Injuries to the biceps tendons are commonly caused by repetitive overhead activity.

Symptoms include:

  • Pain when the arm is overhead or bent.
  • Localized tenderness as the tendon passes over the groove in the upper arm bone.
  • Occasionally, a snapping sound or sensation in the shoulder area.

achilles.jpg

Achilles Tendonitis

Achilles tendinitis is inflammation and irritation, of the Achilles tendon (the tendon that connects the muscles of the calf to the heel).

Symptoms usually include pain in the heel when walking or running. The tendon is usually painful to touch and the skin over the tendon may be swollen and warm. Achilles tendinitis may make you more likely to have an Achilles rupture. This condition usually causes a sharp pain, like someone hit you in the back of the heel with a stick.

bursitis.jpg

Bursitis

Symptoms can vary from an achy pain and stiffness to the local area of the joint, to a burning that surrounds the whole joint around the inflamed bursa. With this condition, the pain is usually worse during and after activity, and the bursa and surrounding joint area can become stiffer the following day. The most common tendon areas that become inflamed are the elbow, shoulder, hip, knee, ankle, and heel. Of course, bursitis can will vary with each person, as it strikes the areas you use and irritate the most.

Copyright © Ontario Laser Health & Rehabilitation Centre. All Rights Reserved. Web Design by Whetham Solutions

Close Form

Book an Appointment

To request an appointment, fill out the form or call us at 705.733.0333.

Required
Required
Required